Trails by Fire, the nomnomnom edition.

Hey Everyone! I hope you’re getting excited about our upcoming public walks! Trails by Fire, 24 August, happened last Sunday and it was awesome to see the great lengths that BES Drongos have improved since the start!

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Look at all the Drongos diligently guiding their fellow Drongos!

The weather was the typical unpredictable Singapore weather with odd drizzles in the middle of the trail. Thankfully, there wasn’t lightning and the drizzles were short so we pushed on. We managed to see some animals particularly the Malayan Blue Coral Snake and Malayan Pit Viper which we had seen previously on our trails. However, this post will be about something that we haven’t talked about, something that will satisfy our stomach…

NOMNOMNOM.

You guessed it: Fruits! While we humans cannot consume all the fruits of the forest, they are nonetheless a source of food for the creatures of the forest. Here are some the fruits we spotted along the trail:

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These Golden Hairy Figs (Ficus aurata) crowding at the base of the leaf does sort of look like a longan, doesn’t it? However, they are in a completely different family as their fellow tropical fruits and are inedible. This particular fig-tree can be distinguished by its distinctive stiff golden hairs that cover its leaves and fruits. It isn’t just the nickname that reflects this fig’s characteristic nature. In fact, it’s latin name, aurata, meaning glided with gold also hints at the golden hairs found on the plant. This shrub is common throughout Singapore so try to spot this enchanting tree if you can!

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Here’s another hairy fruit: the berry of the Hairy Clidemia (Clidemia hirta). This plant is extremely common throughout Singapore and can be found on the outskirts of forests. You can easily recognized it by its hairy leaves! These sweet dark purple berries are a favorite of birds and as you can guess, are dispersed by animals. This berry is supposedly edible and taste like deeply favoured blueberries. However, one should try it with caution as you could get a stomachache.

We have encountered this particular plant many times on our trails so to read more: click here and here.

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This woody pod is not actually a seed as some of you might think; it is actually a fruit! It is the unopened seed pods of the mighty Chewing Gum Tree (Dyera costulata) or perhaps a name that you might be more familiar with: Jelutong. Well, you might be astonished to find that this brown, stiff pod is actually a fruit since we are all used to seeing our typical juicy and fleshy fruits in the supermarkets.

This is due to the mode by which the seed is dispersed from. As you can observe, this unappetizing fruit is probably not going to attract any animal to eat it. Instead, this tall tree (can grow up to 60m!) disperses its seeds via wind. The seedpod will usually open high up in the tree canopy, releasing winged seeds which will be scattered by the wind. It is similar to how your clothes sometimes fall from the bamboo poles. They are rarely found directly under the pole but some distance away!

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This blueberry lookalike is actually the fruit of the Nibong palm (Oncosperma tigillarium). The Nibong Palm is usually found in clusters near water bodies and is distinctive due to its black spine on the stem of the trees. Though the berries might look delicious, they are likely to be inedible so don’t eat them if you see them! However, should you need food desperately, the heart of the palm (inner core of the palm) can be eaten raw or cooked with coconut sauce. Yum!

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Unripe fruit of Rattan palm
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Ripe fruit of Rattan palm

This colorful, scaly fruit is from the Rattan palm (Calamus sp.)  The fruits shown above aren’t ripe yet, but they will soon take on various shades of brown. While we cannot eat it’s fruits, it is still important in the musical world!. Some of the fruits of the rattan will exude a red resin which is called, interestingly, Dragon’s Blood. It is currently being used as a vanish for violins. There are even more common uses for the rattan palms itself how the skin of rattan strands can be weaved into baskets, “cores” made into furniture and perhaps the one we are most familiar with: the rattan cane our parents used to smack us with.

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Last of all, this striped dark and light brown seed is a Rubber Seed (Hevea brasiliensis). It might look innocuous but the capsule (fruit that contains the seeds) actually exploded to throw this seed as far as possible from the parent tree. Though this seed looks rather unextraordinary, the struggle to bring these seeds out of Brazil (the native country) is fraught with bio-piracy, controversy and blood. This makes a fascinating read if you can spare the time.

Well, I hope you have been enlightened about the seeds and fruits of our forest. We’re be going about our trail soon again so do look out for our next misadventures.

For more cool photos: check out our Flickr

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2 thoughts on “Trails by Fire, the nomnomnom edition.”

  1. “While we humans cannot consume all the fruits of the forest, they are nonetheless a source of food for the creatures of the forest.”

    there are other fruits in our forests such as durians, rambutans, mangosteens and even starfruits. they are edible arent they?

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  2. @Andrew, thanks for your comment! Yes, indeed some of the fruits in our forests are edible, like the ones you’ve mentioned before. We also know of some edible fruits that can be found along the Petai Trail, and we will be featuring them in subsequent blog entries!

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