Infographics on the EIA

March for MacRitchie ended on a good note last week, with people sharing about the aspects of MacRitchie that they like and have fallen in love with. To follow up with all that has happened, here’s a post reminding us on the importance of MacRitchie and what we can lose with the construction of the Cross Island Line. If you are not familiar with the Cross Island Line issue, you can read our summary over here first.

Now, we all know that MacRitchie is a key area for Singapore’s biodiversity with many of its areas, including those being surveyed during the site investigation, having important ecological values. With over 2000 plants species and 347 species of animals, this area of high biodiversity is considered to be important for conservation.  However, the Central Catchment Nature Reserve (that MacRitchie is a part of) faces fragmentation pressures and stressors from human use and developmental works. Fragmentation, the break-up of contiguous land masses, limits wildlife movement and compromises the fitness of individuals. Any additional stresses or threats may affect the wildlife and hence the health of their future generations, as well as genetic variability of small populations. In view of this ecological baseline of MacRitchie and the Nature Reserve, an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) was done to highlight the potential impacts arising from soil investigation works and what can be done to mitigate such impacts.

However, we know that reading through the lengthy EIA can be tiring. So here’s some bite size infographics focusing on the EIA’s main findings in volume III, as a continuation of our previous “EIA101: All you need to know!“.  

1. Soil investigation

2. EIA Infographics_noise

EIA Infographic (Water Quality)

While the mitigation measures are comprehensive, here’s a thought from the monkeys:

EIA Infographic (Future Considerations)

We hope these infographics have been useful to gain a better understanding of what the soil investigations are and what impacts and mitigation efforts they entail. Hopefully, this can help you in developing a more informed standing in this issue as well. Now, if you’ll like to help save our MacRitchie forest, here’s two simple steps that you can take: Spread the word about the issue and sign the petition to re-route the line around the forest! You can also share our infographics about volume III of our EIA on Facebook here.

Last but not least, we will like to acknowledge the following individuals/organisations for their invaluable contribution: Main graphics by Rachel Lee, Jacqueline for her amazing pixelated animals drawings, Lahiru and the Love Our MacRitchie Forest team for feedbacks and ideas on the EIA, Chope for Nature for allowing us to use their summary as reference, and last but not least, a big thank you to all of you for supporting our MacRitchie forest!! 🙂 

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