World Water Day 2018

world water day

Psst, World Water Day is coming up soon! Here’s a little tip for you to celebrate the upcoming World Water Day on March 22nd:

Go on down to one of the Singapore World Water Day (SWWD) roadshows with your latest Singapore Power (SP) bill, and if the folks at the roadshow see that you’ve been a diligent water saver, you’ll be able to receive an exclusive premium. This sweet opportunity will be waiting for you during the entirety of March, but limited stocks are available (just like one other precious, precious resource).

Find your nearest roadshow here: https://www.pub.gov.sg/getinvolved/singaporeworldwaterday

The above link is also where you can find SWWD’s official partners, including Ben & Jerry’s and oBike, who are eager to offer you a steal of a deal for the right water-saving attitude.

Here’s something to think about this World Water Day: wetlands. Sure, we need to do all we can to keep that fresh, clean, thirst-quenching clear water running out of our taps. But is that enough? Nature needs water too, and we need nature.

Urbanising cities have a common trend of gradually encroaching on natural spaces like wetlands. These cities will only expand and multiply as time passes, and it may seem a waste to preserve a wetland when it could be a bustling hub. The truth is, however, that wetlands are important to us, even to those of us who live highly urbanised environments. Wetlands provide a wide array of ecosystem services, such as absorbing excess rainfall during storms and helping to reduce the risk of flooding. Now, that’s relevant.

In particular, Singapore boasts a sprawling Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve, which is not only a site teeming with heritage, but also with birds of every shape and size. Native birds, exotic birds that have travelled from across the world to spend the winter in sunny Singapore – our very own wetlands are a key stopping point in the East Asian Australasian Shorebird Site Network, which include Kakadu National Park in Australia, Mai Po in Hong Kong and the Yatsu Tidal Flats in Japan.

This World Water Day, maybe leave a little room in your thoughts for the wetlands around the world and in our own garden city, while you’re taking a short shower.

 

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Save A Spider Day

It’s Save a Spider Day! OK, I know you’re about to click away because spiders are, well, look at them. If you haven’t gazed deep into a spider’s multiple eyes and shuddered, then you’re just a big, hairy, leggy, liar. But if you think about it, like really think about it, you’d probably still choose to live in a world with spiders in it, rather than without. I mean, I doubt Baygone would be a good enough substitute for a worldwide population of diverse spiders deviously conspiring 24/7 to eliminate their next insect. Do you like birds? Well, good, because birds love spiders. (As food.) Do you like diseases? No? Then thank your lucky stars, because spider venom will soon be used to treat a variety of diseases that cause muscular dystrophy. By the way, can YOU pull the natural world’s strongest material out of your butt? No? Then please, take a seat. (If yes, call 995.)

Hey, check out this fancy boy over here.

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Video: Jurgen Otto (https://www.youtube.com/user/Peacockspiderman)

Fashion week has nothing on this male peacock spider. When it’s time to find a lady, the male peacock spiders show off their brightly coloured backs and sweet moves. Peacock spiders are tiny, with the largest species measuring a whopping 5mm. Imagine that, a tiny colourful speck waving its arms at you because that’s the sexy thing to do. Also, the females eat the males who don’t dance well enough, but let’s not dwell on that.

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This spectacular shot by local wildlife photographer Nicky Bay does great justice to the silvery markings on the mirror spider’s abdomen. When the spider is at rest, the silvery shapes on its abdomen visibly enlarge. It almost looks like a piece of stained glass art!

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Photo: ggalice via Flickr

Net casting spiders are metal as it gets. They weave webs that resemble fishnets, which they then launch at their prey to capture them.

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Photo: Nicky Bay

Look at those eyes. They’re not messing around.

Next time you see a spider, maybe think twice before screaming and squashing it (you can still scream, though). First of all, it cannot be denied that spiders are way cooler than us and also do us a huge favour by catching insects. Second of all, I don’t think you’d want to make an enemy of a spider at this point.

 

Sources:

http://www.medicaldaily.com/venom-medicine-how-spiders-scorpions-snakes-and-sea-creatures-can-heal-328736

http://animals.mom.me/importance-spiders-ecosystem-6242.html

 

Goose mother

Gather round, friends. I’m going to tell you the story of Christian Moullec, world’s biggest goose mum.

You’ve probably heard about imprinting, the amazing and sometimes hilarious phenomenon where newly hatched ducklings or goslings look at the first large moving object in their field of vision and think: “That’s it. That’s my mum.”

In other words, imprinting is a process of rapidly forming strong social bonds with a parent within the first day of hatching (or, in the case of mammals, being born). This usually works pretty well, and imprinting is an important process not just in infancy, but also later in life when it’s time to mate. In this story, however, the distinguished mother goose is a 58-year-old moustachioed Frenchman named Christian Moullec. This proud parent hand reared his sweet children from gosling to goose, and the journey was nothing short of adorable spectacular.

Though it may seem cute to have a couple of fluffy little birds waddling after you, parenting is never a trivial matter. Moullec took on the grave responsibility of caring for his goslings 24/7, and this included teaching them to swim.

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When the goslings were three weeks old, they loyally followed Moullec to a pond, where he proceeded to teach them the Goose Basics of Safe Swimming, including Looking Around for Danger, Kicking With Your Legs, and Keeping Your Feathers Oiled. By allowing the ducks to imitate his behaviour, Moullec is able to effectively teach them what any respectable mother goose can.

Fast forward a few weeks, and the geese are more fully grown and ready for the next big thing.

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No, you aren’t dreaming. That is a man-goose-mum in a lightweight aircraft teaching his kids to fly. Thank you, universe, for this blessing. After several training sessions in his minimalist aircraft (known as a microlight), Moullec was able to guide the geese in a graceful soar over the city of Edinburgh, riding in perfect formation.

ss1.png There goes that weird family again.

For more than twenty years now, Moullec has been raising orphaned geese and flying alongside them in his humble microlight. The purpose? To guide them along safe migratory routes. Wild bird populations have been declining in Europe, and Moullec took the matter into his own hands – into his own home, where he raises the birds which would otherwise have been lost without a parent. He also provides visitors with the opportunity to fly alongside the birds and experience the awe and wonder that he knows so well – and that’s how he funds his own project.

“The most beautiful thing to realise on earth is to fly in the heavens with the angels that are the birds.”

– Christian Moullec: pilot, parent, hero.

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Sources:

Earthflight (2011) BBC One.

http://www.indiana.edu/~p1013447/dictionary/imprint.htm

https://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/psychology/psychology-and-psychiatry/imprinting

 

What If Cats and Dogs Had Opposable Thumbs Day

Happy ‘What If Cats and Dogs Have Opposable Thumbs’ Day!

It’s a mouthful, but a joy to say! I personally will be saying this non-stop to all my friends today.

You’re probably wondering why we even have such a day in the first place. Well, you can blame none other than Thomas Roy, who together with his wife have created over ninety holidays – it’s a pretty respectable hobby. Roy invented the holiday while pondering the endless hijinks his pet cats and dogs could get up to if they had opposable thumbs. They would probably eat with their hands, for instance, like monkeys, instead of sticking their entire faces in their food bowls. They could open the fridge and help themselves to your cake. The possibilities are both wonderful and terrifying.

A whole new world.

Opposable thumbs, which are able to face in the opposite direction to the rest of your fingers, are more vital to your daily life than you’ve ever considered. Without them, you couldn’t grab anything, not even your second helping of cheese rings. You wouldn’t be able to shake hands with anyone and would probably resort to slapping at them with your helpless paws, the way cats do now when they want a facerub.

Let’s celebrate the fact that we have opposable thumbs and our pets don’t! After all, it is because of opposable thumbs that we can squeeze their cheeks and they can’t squeeze ours. If they could, life with them would change forever.

Then again, it might not make that much of a difference. I mean, if your cats had opposable thumbs, they could clean up their own poop, but would they?