Tag Archives: biodiversity

Hello from the otterside!

We’ve reached the end of May, and what better way to say goodbye to this month than to celebrate World Otter Day? This year, World Otter Day falls on the 31st of May, and we hope that you’ll be motivated to learn more about these otterly adorable creatures after reading this post. World Otter Day was created with the intention of raising global awareness on these river-loving animals. This is due to the myriad of threats that otters increasingly face such as habitat destruction, hunting and road deaths. Before we talk more about otters, let’s start off with a joke:

photo1.png
I hope you didn’t cringe too much (I tried my best). (Source: Tumblr)

Otters are carnivorous mammals that belong to the weasel family, which includes animals like the badger and wolverine, and there are 13 otter species which can be found all over the world. In North America, you can find the charismatic sea otters, who are often seen relaxing while floating on water. They even hold hands with one another while they’re sleeping to prevent themselves from floating away! In South and Southeast Asia, you can find the Oriental Small-Clawed otter, which is the smallest but one of the more social species among all the otter species.

photo2
Hold on tight! (Source: Tumblr)

In our own island home, we’ve become enamoured with the otter families that elicit squeals of excitement whenever they are spotted. These families comprise of smooth-coated otters, which as the name suggests, have smoother and shorter fur as compared to other otter species. These adventurous otters have been seen exploring places such as St Andrew’s Junior College and the i Light festival at Marina Bay, proving themselves to be highly adept in navigating our urban landscape.

photo3
Having some fun in the sun (Source: ART-ZOO Facebook)

Other than providing us with an overwhelming amount of cuteness, otters also play significant roles in their ecosystems as well. In the case of sea otters, they significantly influence sea urchin and kelp populations. Sea otters munch on sea urchins which consume kelp. By eating the sea urchins, sea otters keep the populations in check, which prevents kelp forests from being overgrazed on by sea urchins. It’s important to maintain healthy kelp forests as they are rich sources of nutrients to fish and other marine organisms.

photo4.jpg
Without sea otters, kelp forests would be devastated 😦 (Source: Seaotters.com)

Sadly, most otter species are facing falling population numbers and this can be attributed to a few reasons. One major reason would be pollution which contaminates water bodies where otters are mostly found. Harmful chemicals from the run-offs can accumulate in the otters and their prey are affected by the pollution as well, jeopardising the food sources of the otters.

You may be wondering, how can I contribute to World Otter Day? Well, even a small action is pretty significant! You could aim to spread the message about otters to people around you and raise awareness on their situation. Another simple way of contributing would be being considerate towards our local otters (and all other wildlife in fact!). Some tips include giving the otters adequate space upon encountering them and keeping our waterways clean to give them optimal habitats to thrive in. With that, happy World Otter Day and enjoy the rest of this week 🙂

References:

Asian small-clawed otter | Animal Fact Sheet – Woodland Park Zoo Seattle WA. (2017). Zoo.org. Retrieved 21 May 2017, from https://www.zoo.org/page.aspx?pid=2549#.WSGHxGh942w

Sea Otter | National Geographic. (2010). Nationalgeographic.com. Retrieved 21 May 2017, from http://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/s/sea-otter/

SEAOTTERS.COM – POWERED BY CUTENESS™. (2017). SEAOTTERS.COM – POWERED BY CUTENESS™. Retrieved 21 May 2017, from http://seaotters.com/2013/05/why-are-sea-otters-important-no-sea-otters-no-kelp-forests/

Threats to Sea Otters. (2012). Defenders of Wildlife. Retrieved 21 May 2017, from http://www.defenders.org/sea-otter/threats

Words by: Tan Hui Xin

Nature’s Workers

Stand up for workers all over the world because it’s International Workers’ Day (a.k.a. Labour Day)! It’s a day to pay tribute to everyone who has worked hard in their fields for the success and well-being of our nation: architects, designers, engineers, cleaners and many, many more. In the natural world, working is also part and parcel of animals’ lives for their families and their survival. Ants and bees are perhaps the most widely known hardworking animals. But, do you know of other animals that perform similar jobs as people do? As we celebrate this holiday with our family and friends, let’s take a moment to appreciate and applaud some of the most industrious animals in the natural world!

Beavers

One of nature’s greatest engineers, the beaver is the only animal capable of changing their environment after man! These large rodents work diligently to construct dams in rivers or streams to transform fields and forests into large, nice and cosy ponds as their homes for winter. Preparation for this massive construction project starts all the way from late summer to fall. With the help of their strong teeth and powerful jaws, the beavers are able to chip away at tree trunks to acquire logs and branches for construction. After being broken down into smaller pieces, the beavers would carry the materials to the construction site and start building the dam by laying sticks and stacking branches in the mud.

Satin Bowerbirds

The male Satin Bowerbird is perhaps the most accomplished interior designer in the animal kingdom. The males spend lots of hard work and time to build and decorate nests to attract females’ attentions. Pebbles, shells and flowers are among some of the artistic objects the males use in their creative nest design.

Cleaner Wrasse

Just like how we pay great attention on public health and hygiene, cleanliness is also an important concern in the marine world. And this heavy responsibility lies on the Cleaner Wrasse. These tiny fishes work 24/7 scrubbing off unwanted parasites and dead scales on the fins, tails and even mouths of other reef fishes. The reward of their hard work is the feast of parasites! The Cleaner Wrasse has a long list of clients, including larger fishes which might be potential predators!

wrasse
The Hawaiian Cleaner Wrasse (Source: http://www.marinelifephotography.com/fishes/wrasses/labroides-phthirophagus.htm)

Aren’t all these creatures amazing?! Not only do animals work long days and nights to survive, they also work hard in maintaining our ecosystem with their irreplaceable skill sets, such as acting as pollinators and decomposers. On this Labour Day, let’s also celebrate the contributions animals have made!

Happy Labour Day!

References:

National Geographic. (n.d.). Beaver. Retrieved from: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/b/beaver/

Animal Planet. (n.d.) The Beauticians. Retrieved from: http://www.animalplanet.com/wild-animals/5-the-beauticians/

Animal Planet. (n.d.) The Builders. Retrieved from: http://www.animalplanet.com/wild-animals/9-the-builders/

Animal Planet. (n.d.) Interior Decorators. Retrieved from: http://www.animalplanet.com/wild-animals/6-interior-decorators/

Words by: Ho Lijean

Tricksters of the Animal World

Hello friends, it’s April Fools’ Day! You know what that means: tricks and jokes galore! But if you are here on this blog, reading this post, then you may have been on the internet researching about cool pranks to pull on your friends (of course). Since you’re already here, how about a quick post to brighten your day? On this day of fun and games, let’s take a look at the amazing tricksters of the animal world, who may trick their way around to stay alive, or just to have a good time.

First in line is a relative of our namesake, the drongo. Specifically the Fork-tailed Drongo, hailed as the Kalahari desert’s greatest trickster. Almost 23 percent of their daily intake is stolen food, but for the animals that they steal from, the drongo is essentially a friendly watchbird, until he pulls a quick prank on them.

Image result for fork tailed drongo
Fork-tailed Drongo (Source: https://africageographic.com/blog/feisty-fearless-clever-fork-tailed-drongo/)

When a predator is near, the drongo calls out in alarm to warn its friends, such as the meerkats, sending them scurrying away for cover. That’s pretty helpful, except the drongo swoops down and steals the food the meerkats left in their quest for a hiding spot.

The drongo tries this a few times, although the meerkats learn and eventually the gig is up. But here’s something cool: as a final trick, the drongo mimics the meerkat’s own alarm call, and this time, the meerkats fall for it, scattering away as the drongo cackles internally and steals their food once again.

But what are words when there are videos? There’s a cool clip that you may enjoy, complete with dramatic music and professional videography.

Next, we have the Leaf Fish. Granted, it’s not as cute as the Fork-tailed Drongo, but there’s a reason. This freshwater fish looks and acts like a dead leaf, held up in a ‘floating’ position by its small, transparent fins. They’ll casually float close enough to their prey, and everyone’s having a good time until it strikes at the last moment, consuming smaller fishes with its projectile mouth.

Image result for leaf fish
Leaf Fish (Source: https://philliplynda.wordpress.com/2013/12/14/another-first-spiny-leaf-fish-at-cook-island-marine-reserve/)

The attack lasts a quarter of a second, so blink and you’ll miss it.

Then we have the Virginia opossum. The term ‘playing possum’ originates from this little guy, as when its frightened, the animal involuntarily drops ‘dead’, during which it stiffens with its mouth open and drooling and releases a stench of decay. The opossum’s drool also causes predators to steer clear of them, as drooling usually indicates sickness.

Opossum 2.jpg
Virginia Opossum (Source: Cody Pope – Wikipedia:User:Cody.pope, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1705724)

It’s not a very graceful defence, although playing dead never is. What’s that? You want a video? Sure, now’s as good a time as any to watch a live opossum being dead for three minutes.

Next, we have the Spider-tailed Horned Viper, a species belonging to a genus of venomous vipers, who are so tricky it’s evil. As you can tell from its name, the end of its tail resembles a spider, which it uses as a lure for insectivorous birds. The resemblance is so similar that the bird may perch on the snake itself, landing it well within the snake’s striking range.

Spider-tailed Horned Viper (Source: Omid Mozaffari – http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0811+3699, CC0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=25942622)

This is an incredible evolutionary adaptation that’s honed a remarkable hunting technique. Here’s the first ever video taken of the viper in action. Watch it with caution, as the narrator’s voice may scare you a little more than the viper itself.

Last but not least, we definitely can’t leave out one of the most intelligent tricksters in the animal kingdom, the Mimic Octopus. This sea creature can easily mimic up to 15 different species (and counting), although only it’s mimicry of the lion fish, banded sole and sea snake are caught on video. It has been reported that it can also copy the stingray, jellyfish and starfish.

Image result for mimic octopus
Mimic Octopus (Source: http://thehigherlearning.com/2014/06/19/the-indonesian-mimic-octopus-is-the-animal-kingdoms-master-of-disguise-video/)

Pretty cool stuff.

We’ve reached the end of this post, but before I finish up, I’d like to encourage fellow readers to go ahead and learn about the other tricky animals that deserve equal attention. It’s all very entertaining content, I promise you.

Have a happy April Fools’!

References:

Basham, Jessica. “Scared To Death: Opossums Play Possum”. Welcome to Walton Outdoors. N.p., 2010. Web. 31 Mar. 2017.

Morell, Virginia. “African Bird Shouts False Alarms To Deceive And Steal, Study Shows”. News.nationalgeographic.com. N.p., 2014. Web. 31 Mar. 2017.

Words by: Gwyneth Cheng

Giants in our waters

Biodiversity is found everywhere,

and good places must be shared,

Sharing our knowledge is caring with courage,

so go and be brave, explore there!

While the BES Drongos guide at Macritchie’s Petai Trail, our guides are equally passionate about helping others learn more about biodiversity in other parts of Singapore as well!

Last month, 2 BES Drongos guides joined participants from NUS’s University Scholars Programme on a trip to St John’s Island, located a short 25 minute ferry away from Marina South Pier. St John’s Island forms part of Singapore’s Southern Islands, a planning area comprising of other islands like Kusu Island and the Sisters’ Islands. Geographically, all of them are found just south of Sentosa (see map below).

sgmap for clam post
Singapore’s outlying islands. The Southern Islands are demarcated by the red border (Image source: https://cdn-az.allevents.in/banners/fa153bd9789f5ec5cdo21d3f528d9c42)

There, students visited St John’s Island National Marine Laboratory, which houses the Marine Park Outreach and Education Centre, and listened to both Dr Serena Teo and Dr Neo Mei Lin who are key staff based at the facility. Students then got to tour the grounds, with the highlight being the Giant Clam Hatchery, which breeds 2 species of giant clams, the Fluted Giant Clam (Tridacna squamosa) and the Boring Giant Clam (T. crocea).

TMSI tour
Dr Neo giving students a tour of the Giant Clam Hatchery (Photo by Angela Chan)

For those who don’t know, Dr Neo is one of the world’s leading scientists in researching giant clams, and was recently named a TED Fellow. Part of her research is to maintain the Giant Clam Hatchery, which grows giant clams until they are large enough to be re-introduced into Singapore waters. In a similar fashion to animal rehabilitation, a hatchery relies on the genetic material of giant clams in the wild to produce offspring, and protect these new clams from predators and other threats, allowing them to grow without interference until they are old enough to defend for themselves.

Why focus on giant clams then? Giant clams worldwide currently play an important role for the coral reef ecosystem, being sources of food with for other marine animals because of its large primary productivity, shelter for a mixture of coral reef fish and epibionts (creatures that live on the clam’s shell) as well as having reef scale contributions by contributing carbonate and regulating eutrophication (acting as a nutrient filter) (Neo et al., 2015). Furthermore, their long lifespans spanning around a hundred years mean they are bioindicators to help scientists understand the health of the coral reef they reside in (“Giant Clam”, n.d.).

However, giant clams are being threatened by multiple drivers, including coral reef degradation, harvesting and aquarium trade, such that might become locally extinct if marine biologists do not intervene (Neo & Todd, 2013). Thankfully with passionate individuals like Dr Neo, and the infrastructure of St John’s Marine Laboratory, giant clams here may just be spared a fate of doom, and we hope that giant clams can soon be found thriving once again!

All in all, I personally enjoyed myself at the facility. Seeing and learning about giant clams for the first time was a good reminder that biodiversity is diverse, beautiful and needs to be shown respect and care for by humans. The island itself also has a pleasant, tranquil feel to it, offering several recreational spaces, many furry felines, and even a beach (on adjacent Lazarus Island) should you want to get yourself ready for the June holidays! The Marine Park Outreach and Education Centre is open 7 days a week and St John’s Island is assessable by ferry 2 times a day on weekdays and up to 5 times a day on weekends.

That’s all for now, stay tuned to our blog for more updates as we talk about biodiversity in other parts of Singapore too!!!

Bibliography

Neo, M. L., Eckman, W., Vicentuan, K., Teo, S. L. M., & Todd, P. A. (2015). The ecological significance of giant clams in coral reef ecosystems. Biological Conservation181, 111-123.

Neo, M. L., & Todd, P. A. (2013). Conservation status reassessment of giant clams (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Tridacninae) in Singapore. Nature in Singapore6, 125-133.

Giant Clam. (n.d.). Oceana. Retrieved 15 March 2017, from http://oceana.org/marine-life/corals-and-other-invertebrates/giant-clam

Words by: Chow Tak Wei

Whale, whale, whale, what have we here?

A sperm whale recovered by the Lee Kong Chien Natural History Museum. Photos by (clockwise from left): Marcus Chua, Becky Lee, & Letchumi Mani

When a dead whale washed up on Jurong island on the 10th of July, 2015, nature enthusiasts across Singapore were shocked. When you think of Singapore’s marine life, many people would think of fish, crabs or maybe even sea turtles! But a whale? On our tiny island? Never!

But lo and behold, the first large whale carcass found in Singapore for over a hundred years had been found, and on Singapore’s jubilee year no less. The animal itself is a 10.6m long female sperm whale, and it is the first confirmed sighting of its kind in our waters. While it is rather upsetting that the whale was found dead, its death shall not be in vain. As of time of writing, the whale itself is being salvaged by the Lee Kong Chien Natural History museum to be made into a display!

Photo of the old “Singapore Whale”. Photo from the International Year of Biodiversity Singapore

Older readers may remember the old “Singapore whale” that used to hang in the original Raffles Museum at Stamford Road. That specimen was actually recovered in Malacca, and was an impressive 13m long. In 1974, the whale was given to Muzium Negara in Malaysia when the museum had to move to smaller premises. Today, the skeleton stands in the Maritime Museum in Labuan, off Sabah.

The museum was never really quite the same without its awe-inspiring whale skeleton. Which is why the Lee Kong Chien Natural History Museum is calling for donations to do up a new display for the sperm whale!

Jubilee whale fund logo by the Lee Kong Chien Natural History Museum

The museum hopes to inspire future generations with this display, just like how the old Singapore whale fired up imaginations in the past. The display itself will a testament to the biodiversity education, research and conservation efforts by the museum, but to do so they need financial help.

If you are interested in donating, you can do so here! If you are interested in looking at the preservation and salvaging process of the whale, you can look at photos here. Finally, to learn more about the new and old whales, you can read up on them here.

We hope that you are as excited about the whale as we are! After all, we should always remember:

inside_white

Promotional art by Jacqueline Chua

Words by Jacqueline Chua